On our founder's death in 1890, the practice was continued by his son Colonel WEP Burges, and a partnership with WJ Sloan led to the firm becoming Burges & Sloan. Between 1897 and 1962, the firm was based in Marsh Street, and changed name several times. In the 1920s, new partner Wilfred Scammell joined the firm and later wrote The Law of Agricultural Holdings, a text book which brought national recognition for the firm's agricultural practice. Now a work bearing the names of two former partners of the firm, Scammell & Densham, its ninth edition was published in 2007.

In 1946 the firm lost its longest-serving member of staff, Edwin Light Wyatt, who had served the firm for over 80 years. He received a letter from King George VI congratulating him on his extraordinary record of long service.

In 1947 the partnership was joined by Stuart Evans, who was then practising alone as Salmon, Cumberland and Evans. The firm's move to Narrow Quay House in 1982 saw the shortening of the firm’s name to "Burges Salmon". Since that date, the firm has grown to become one of the most respected and professional commercial firms in the country.

In 2010, we moved to One Glass Wharf, a modern office building in the Bristol Temple Quarter Enterprise Zone.

In 2016, we refreshed our brand to better reflect our values, our people and the modernity of our offices in Bristol and London.

 

Burges Salmon people at the unveiling of our Shaun the Sheep