Interior of a CAV
Overview

The UK is in a unique position to be at the forefront of the connected and autonomous vehicle (CAV) market which has the potential to be worth £51 billion per year to the UK economy by 2030. Our specialist team of CAV lawyers are at the cutting edge of developments working on ground-breaking projects and thought leadership on legal and regulatory issues and reform. We advise on a broad range of CAV issues from intellectual property and cyber security to the allocation of risk and liability.

Our CAV team combines experience and expertise to help clients unlock the commercial opportunities of driverless cars. We advise on CAV legal issues from establishing collaborative partnerships to risk and insurance and data protection. Our team comprises experts in regulation, insurance, automotive manufacturing, intellectual property, technology, data protection and cyber security combined with industry recognised transport sector experts.

We deliver technical excellence and commercially astute advice to both the public and private sectors on all aspects of CAVs and CAV technology and systems.

We are working as the supporting legal partner for a number of projects including VENTURER and FLOURISH, based in the South West, as well as national project CAPRI. As part of our work on VENTURER we have worked with AXA to produce a report on the legal and insurance implications of CAVs

What are connected and autonomous vehicles?

The Department for Transport’s (DfT) Code of Practice describes a fully autonomous vehicle as ‘one in which a driver is not necessary’ although these vehicles will be able to carry passengers. While the reality of fully autonomous vehicles on our roads is some way off, many connected vehicles already exist on our roads. Connected vehicle technologies allow vehicles to talk to each other and to the infrastructure around them. Many people will already be familiar with connected vehicle technologies, e.g. satellite navigation, telematics and 'eCall'.

CAVs are often discussed in the context of ‘levels of automation’. The levels of automation (as prescribed by SAE International Standard J3016) describe the level of autonomous vehicle technology.

Experience

We work as a partner to the VENTURER consortium investigating the public acceptance of driverless cars. We are working in collaboration with AXA to investigate the insurance and liability enablers for bringing driverless cars to the market.

We work closely with the FLOURISH consortium to identify innovative solutions designed to realise the market readiness of CAVs, in particular in relation to the use of data and cyber security.

Advising RAC on its development of Connected Car telematics solutions to support its insurance, fleet management and breakdown services.

Advising ULTra (BAA subsidiary) on the arrangements for the international commercialisation and licensing of intellectual property for software-controlled driverless pods, including at Heathrow Airport terminal 5.

Meet the team
Chris Jackson

Chris Jackson Partner

  • Head of Transport
  • Procurement and State Aid
  • Health and Safety
Helen Scott-Lawler

Helen Scott-Lawler Partner

  • Commercial
  • Intellectual Property and Media
  • Sport
Brian Wong

Brian Wong Legal Director

  • Rail
  • Highways and Road Transport
  • Judicial Review and Public Law
Edward Barratt

Edward Barratt Senior Associate

  • Projects
Lucy Pegler

Lucy Pegler Senior Associate

  • Technology
Thomas Webb

Thomas Webb Legal Director

  • Fraud and White Collar Crime
  • Banking Disputes
  • Dispute Resolution

Levels of automation

Human driver monitors driving environment

  • Level 0
    No Automation
    Human driver controls all aspects of driving all of the time.
  • Level 1
    Driver Assistance
    Human driver is assisted with either steering or acceleration/deceleration by the driver assistance system with the expectation that the human driver will perform all remaining functions. 
  • Level 2

    Partial Automation
    Driver assistance system undertakes steering and acceleration/deceleration using information about the driving environment with the expectation that the human driver will perform all other driving tasks.

Automated driving system monitors driving environment

  • Level 3
    Conditional Automation
    Automated driving system undertakes all aspects of the dynamic driving task with the expectation that the human driver will respond appropriately to a request to intervene.
  • Level 4
    High Automation
    Automated driving system undertakes all aspects of the dynamic driving task, even if a human driver does not respond appropriately to a request to intervene.
     
  • Level 5
    Full Automation
    Automated driving system undertakes all aspects of the dynamic driving tasks in all roadway and environmental conditions.

Key contact

Chris Jackson

Chris Jackson Partner

  • Head of Transport
  • Procurement and State Aid
  • Health and Safety

Connected and Autonomous Vehicles

The largest step change in transport since Henry Ford started selling different coloured cars.
Chris Jackson, Partner

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